Bangalore Fort and Palace International Conference on
Global Software Engineering

ICGSE 2008
Bangalore, India
August 17-20, 2008

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  WORKSHOPS

The ICGSE 2008 offers 3 full-day workshops and 1 half-day workshop. Workshops will take place on August 17.
Workshop chair: Aravind Raman, Bosch, India

W1: Tool-Supported Development and Management in Distributed Projects
Chintan Amrit, University of Twente, Patrick Keil,TU Munchen, Marco Kuhrmann, TU Munchen
Synopsys:
We need concepts and tools to support the specific needs, tasks and process requirements in distributed development projects. Experience shows that an appropriate tool chain increases efficiency and success of distributed projects since coordination and collaboration are far more complex than in on-site projects and need to be properly supported. Aspects like process assistance, knowledge management or project tracking ask for appropriate tools. Therefore, the workshop will walk through the methods and concepts that are available and the tool chains that are used in global software development projects.

For more information see Workshop website



W2: State of art of Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP)
S. Kotrappa, Department of Computer Science & Engineering & M.C.A K L E S's College of Engg., & Technology, Belgaum-India.
Synopsys:
AOP (AOSD) techniques can greatly improve modularity in software systems. The degree of separation achievable is related to the type of concern being implemented. No great change in the complexity of the system as a whole following the reimplementation AOP (AOSD) techniques can greatly aid the maintenance of concerns. Applying AOP (AOSD) techniques to a software development effort can greatly increase the overall modularity of the application that is produced. The separation of both development and production concerns that is possible with AOP (AOSD) is much greater than that possible with traditional approaches such as object-oriented software development.

For more information see Workshop website



W3: Distributed Software Development - Methods and Tools for Risk Management (Half-Day Workshop)
Juho Mäkiö, Research Centre for Information Technologies, Stefanie Betz, University Karlsruhe, Rafael Prikladnicki, PUCRS, Brazil
Synopsys:
The challenging issues arising in the field of offshore software engineering projects require novel approaches in risk analysis, project planning, and methods in order to handle the bounded financial and technical risks. The goal of this workshop is to provide a forum for researchers and professionals interested in global software development to discuss and exchange ideas. In particular, this workshop takes the perspective of the practitioner and focuses on the techniques that will help software professionals to meet the unique challenges in a global development environment. Thus, the major goal of this workshop is to discuss novel methodologies for risk management for global software development. Additionally, we want to provide a platform bringing together researches and practitioners in order to share their knowledge and requirements in the field of offshore software development.

For more information see Workshop website



W4: Studying Work Practices in Global Software Engineering (GSE)
Gabriela Avram, University of Limerick, Ireland, Liam Bannon, University of Limerick, Ireland, Alexander Boden, University of Siegen, Germany, Volker Wulf, University of Siegen / Fraunhofer Germany
Synopsys:
The purpose of this workshop is to bring together researchers in the GSE field who wish to examine the strengths and limitations of empirical research methods being deployed in the field. Methods are not simply techniques to be chosen and deployed at will, but are constructed from particular conceptual worldviews, and entail theoretical commitments. Actual use of methods also requires training and a sensitivity to the local situation. These issues are often not adequately dealt with before the researcher enters the field.

For more information see Workshop website